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11 Jan

Carrie Mae Weems on Her Favorite Books

Carrie Mae Weems in her library. Photo: David Paul Broda   by Jo Steffens | The Paris Review The following is excerpted from Unpacking My Library: Artists and Their Books, a collection of interviews with contemporary artists about their personal libraries, to be published by Yale University Press in November.   INTERVIEWER Your photographic work incorporates family stories, autobiography, documentary, and other narrative forms. What do you consider to be your role as a storyteller? CARRIE MAE WEEMS In the past I’ve employed elements of text in and around my work,...
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11 Jan

ARTISTS AT WORK: LORNA SIMPSON

LORNA SIMPSON IN BROOKLYN, NEW YORK, JULY 2016. PHOTOS: VICTORIA STEVENS. HAIR: EDRIS FOR EDRIS SALON. MAKEUP: AMENAWON GREEN FOR SGRAYUNLIMITED THE AGENCY.  (Another one of the groundbreaking artists in my life; we were in the same class together at Art & Design HS.  She was always a star. <3) by William J. Simmons | INTERVIEW This summer, during group shows and ahead of fall exhibition openings, we’re visiting New York-based artists in their studios. Lorna Simpson has been at the forefront of conceptual art for over...
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1 Dec

Joni Mitchell: Fear of a Female Genius

Getty Images/Ringer Illustration   One of the greatest living artists in popular music still isn’t properly recognized. Joni transcends gender, genre and time. Here’s why.   by Lindsay Zoladz | The Ringer In one of the golden, waning years of the 1960s, Chuck Mitchell told his young wife to read Saul Bellow’s novel Henderson the Rain King. It was not a gesture of marital kindness so much as a power move: Chuck was older and more educated than Joan, and to her ears, his book recommendations always...
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26 Nov

‘Hair Nah!’ Video Game: Don’t Touch My Hair

This Black Woman Made A Video Game After People Kept Touching Her Hair by Khalea Underwood | Refinery 29 When someone touches your hair without permission, feels happen — and not just the physical kind. It's uncomfortable. Unwarranted. Rude. Weird. Demeaning. Scary. It's easy for people to ask "what's the big deal" about the whole ordeal when they haven't experienced it themselves...
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18 Nov

History! Nigeria’s Bobsled Team Heads to Winter Olympics

Photo: Obi Grant by Veronica Hilbring | Essence For the first time in its history, Nigeria will compete at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang and it’s all thanks to the women’s bobsled team. Led by driver Seun Adigun and her teammates — Ngozi Onwumere and Akuoma Omeoga — the bobsled team qualified in Canada after completing the fifth of the required five races. The team is the first African team to qualify in the bobsled category. Seun Adigun told Kwesé ESPN, “This is a huge milestone...
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18 Nov

O.M.G.: ‘Betty — They Say I’m Different’ Film Premiere

Image taken from Betty – They Say I'm Different poster by The Wire Betty – They Say I'm Different profiles the groundbreaking funk musician described by Miles Davis as “Madonna before Madonna, Prince before Prince” Film maker Phil Cox has written and directed a documentary about the reclusive funk songwriter and vocalist Betty Davis. Called Betty – They Say I'm Different, the film draws on archival footage, animation, interviews and song lyrics to tell the story of Davis’s life, from her childhood through...
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5 Oct

Angel Rich, “The Next Steve Jobs”

BusinessWomen Angel Rich, from Washington, DC, has developed a very innovative app called Credit Stacker that teaches students about personal finance, credit management, and entrepreneurship in a fun and engaging way. The app is so popular that 200,000 people downloaded it to their smart phones and tablets within just two weeks of it's launch. Even more, Forbes has named her "The Next Steve Jobs". Remarkably, the app has been named the "best financial literacy product in the country" by the Office of...
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5 Oct

‘Sunrise, Sunset’ by Edwidge Danticat

Illustration by Bianca Bagnarelli The New Yorker It comes on again on her grandson’s christening day. A lost moment, a blank spot, one that Carole does not know how to measure. She is there one second, then she is not. She knows exactly where she is, then she does not. Her older church friends tell similar stories about their surgeries, how they count backward from ten with an oxygen mask over their faces, then wake up before reaching one, only to find...
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30 Jul

150 Records by African Women You Should Listen To

Muthoni the Drummer Queen. Image courtesy of the artist. by OKAYAFRICA Just like NPR and The Fader, the OkayAfrica team took a stab at listing 150 records made by amazing African for you to discover and rediscover. We hope you enjoy listening through as much as we enjoyed putting together this list of African women who’ve shaped African music from the continent and around the world. 1. Alsarah & The Nubatones (Sudan) – Manara 2. Angelique Kidjo (Benin) – Logozo 3. Asa (Nigeria) – Beautiful Imperfection 4....
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26 Jul

Esperanza Spalding is Writing & Recording ‘Exposure’ Over 3 Day FB Livestream

by Winston Cook-Wilson | SPIN Esperanza Spalding, Grammy-award-winning singer-songwriter and jazz bassist extraordinaire (and now Harvard Professor!), has announced her new album, though she hasn’t written any songs. On September 12 at 12 p.m. Eastern, Spalding will begin writing and recording her next album, aptly titled Exposure–move over, Robert Fripp–limiting herself to a 77-hour timeframe and live-streaming the entire thing. (Yes, that includes the sleep breaks). The audience will be able to chat comments to Spalding during the process. There will be other...
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21 Jul

Forgotten Black Women of Early Hollywood @ CAAM

The Blood of Jesus, 1941. USA. Directed by Spencer Williams | Courtesy Sack Amusement Enterprises/Photofest and California African American Museum by Nadra Nittle | KCET.org Hollywood has long had a problem with representation and diversity, especially concerning anyone female and nonwhite. In the first half of the 20th century, black women were largely relegated to playing mammy and jezebel roles. D.W. Griffith’s 1915 classic “Birth of a Nation” even depicted African Americans as rapists and imbeciles, leading to a resurgence of the...
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8 Jul

Nina Simone in Liberia

Nina Simone, left, at Wilhelmina "Coo Coo" Tubman's birthday party in Monrovia, 1974. Courtesy of the Parker family collection, Monrovia, Liberia  by Katherina Grace Thomas Guernica Someone who knew Nina Simone well—a Liberian friend of hers, I suppose a mutual friend now—told me a story. Liberia’s past is in pieces, he said, and here’s one of them. Maybe it’s the one you’re looking for. On a September night in 1974, the wet season was closing down and an encore of rain washed the streets...
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7 Jul

We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women, 1965–85 | 4/21-9/17/2017

“Waterbearer” by Lorna Simpson, 1986. Courtesy of Lorna Simpson. © 1986 Lorna Simpson Faith Ringgold (right) and Michele Wallace (middle) at Art Workers Coalition Protest, Whitney Museum, 1971. © Jan van Raay #wewantedarevolution Focusing on the work of black women artists, We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women, 1965–85 examines the political, social, cultural, and aesthetic priorities of women of color during the emergence of second-wave feminism. It is the first exhibition to highlight the voices and experiences of women of color—distinct from the...
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2 Jul

The 2017 List: 200 Black Women in Tech on Twitter

by Jeneba Jalloh Ghatt | Hackernoon To learn the story behind how this list started read “Yes We Tech (2016)” and for any additional information, visit our brand new site dedicated honoring and recognizing brilliant black women in tech, BlackWomenTech.com. In sum, the 200 Black women In Tech to Follow on Twitter list was initially created to combat the virtual absence of the acknowledgment of the fact that there is ample Black Women working in tech. Like other social demographics in the tech space...
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2 Jul

‘Woke Foods’, 1st Dominican Vegan Food Business in NYC

by Katherine Hernandez | Medium With Anthony Santos’ bachata mix playing on her iPhone, 26-year-old Dominican Chef Ysanet Batista sways her hips back and forth as she stirs vegetables in a caldero. The freshly washed produce sizzles in hot oil as Santos croons in the background. Wrapped in an apron, Batista shifts from left to right in her small Washington Heights kitchen, contemplating what to add next to the pot. “She’s like a mad scientist, tasting a little bit of this...
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1 Jul

Acrush: Chinese Boy Band Made Up of 5 Girls

Jiayang Fan | The New Yorker The forces underlying Acrush’s gender fluidity are more complicated than they might appear from outside China. Just when you thought the boy-band phenomenon had finally run its course (in how many more directions can One Direction go?), a Chinese iteration goes and renovates the form. At first blush, the five members of Acrush (the “A” stands for Adonis, the Greek god of male beauty) resemble the prototypical Simon Cowell-culled group: boyishly handsome, impeccably groomed, freakishly flawless...
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27 Jun

Feminism in Anime, Pt. 3: Adults

VMartinwrites Spectrum Council for Diversity in Media To conclude our list we have anime that is both feminist and for a mature audience. When I say ‘mature’ I don’t mean the typical puerile idea of ‘maturity’ being equal to being snarky sex jokes and profanity. These anime are of the maturity that comes with facing life post-high school and staring down realistic issues: unemployment, failing society’s expectations, and violent that isn’t just bloody but has a deep psychological aspect. The stories...
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