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9 Apr

Hassan Hajjaj’s “A Day in the Life of Karima: A Henna Girl” World Premiere

Produced and directed by Hassan Hajjaj, 2015, 71 minutes, color Moroccan artist Hassan Hajjaj’s first feature-length film, Karima: A Day in the Life of a Henna Girl, premieres at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s Bing Theater May 13th, 2015 FREE. Taking viewers into the world of one Hajjaj’s most iconic series, Kesh Angels, the film depicts the “henna girls” of Marrakesh. During the course of a day, Hajjaj follows a businesswoman named Karima and her friends, who work as henna artists in Jemaa...
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15 Feb

“Oya: Rise of the Orishas”- Reimagining Orishas as Modern-Day Superheroes

I've been waiting for this film since the buzz about it years ago. by Tambay A. Obenson Shadow and Act British filmmaker Nosa Igbinedion's "Oya: Rise of the Orishas" is now available to watch in full online. Long-time readers will recall that it's a project we've been following on this blog for about 2 years, since the filmmaker took to crowdfunding to raise money to complete it. A welcomed project that digs into the pantheon of Orishas as inspiration for a superhero-style picture, here's a description...
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13 Feb

Hassan Hajjaj’s “My Rock Stars Experimental” @ The Newark Museum 2/25 – 9/2015

Hassan Hajjaj: My Rock Stars presents a video installation by Moroccan-born, UK-based artist Hassan Hajjaj, along with a related series of photographs, in a salon installation designed expressly for the exhibition. The video, My Rock Stars Experimental, Volume I (2012), recently acquired by the Newark Museum, pays tribute to individuals who—though they may not all be famous—have inspired the artist personally.  The video features nine separately filmed performances by an international group of musicians and singers whose influences include hip-hop, jazz, as well...
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6 Feb

Hey NYC! A Black Indies Feast (1968-1986) Feb/2015 @ Film Society of Lincoln Center

Still from "Joe's Bed-Stuy Barbershop: We Cut Heads" by Tambay Obenson IndieWire (Now Shadow & Act) Wow! This is an absolutely awesome-looking series that New Yorkers who love cinema would surely be interested in - the kind that, if I had the resources, I'd put together myself.I'll dig into specifics in future posts, highlighting individual films and filmmakers (most you'd already be familiar with, especially if you're a reader of this blog) leading up to the launch; But, for now, I'll just dump the lengthy press release...
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6 Feb

U2 on the Tom Snyder Show 06/04/81

I was there, in an audience of about 100 people. We were thrilled to meet them after the show, and even though the excitement was palpable, we had no idea this band would become one of the major super groups of the century. All we knew was that "I Will Follow" was a Mudd Club favorite! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_K_I2SQsIZE          ...
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6 Feb

Google Doodle Honors Langston Hughes’ 113th Birthday 02/01/15

What does “I Dream A World” mean to you? To doodler Katy Wu, Langston Hughes’ poem is a message of equality and hope. “This poem has a hopeful message and I like that. It comes from a time where there was a lot of work to be done for civil rights,” says Katy. That’s a sentiment Hughes also shared when writing his poem, which first originated as a lyric in the the opera Troubled Island by William Grant Still. As Hughes experienced...
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5 Feb

“Crumbs”: An Ethiopian Post-Apocalyptic, Surreal, Sci-Fi Film

by Tambay A. Obenson | Shadow and Act An unexpectedly peculiar film, and I love what I see here, if only for that reason. But there's more than enough in it to make me want to see the entire film. It's not exactly a regular occurrence that I come across post-apocalyptic, sci-fi romance films, starring Ethiopians. Miguel Llansó’s "Crumbs," a Spanish-Ethiopian co-production which made its world premiere on Tuesday (Jan 27) at the International Film Festival Rotterdam (IFFR), will have its market premiere at...
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5 Feb

Maasai Cricket Warriors: A Kenyan Tribal Cricket Team Saving Their People

...and absolutely beautiful by HINT Fashion Magazine Semi-nomadic and cattle-dependent, the Maasai face catastrophic peril on nearly every front. They've experienced the ravages of HIV/AIDS, and the loss of land and livestock to outside threats. Meanwhile, they continue to suffer the entrenched practices of female genital mutilation and child marriage. The villagers' safety, livelihood, and very existence hang in the balance. So while the cricket players are out to win, they're also on a mission to bring education and equality to the tribe, and...
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